Nominate an Ashoka Fellow

DO YOU KNOW SOMEONE WITH A POWERFUL NEW IDEA?

Ashoka Philippines is searching the country for the next batch of Filipino Ashoka Fellows. Help us find and support our most promising social innovators.

We invite you to take the crucial first step by becoming a member of our nominator network. Tell us where the exciting work is being done and who is most deserving of our support.

Read through the five selection criteria carefully to make sure the nominee fits our understanding of a leading social entrepreneur.

Ashoka Fellows can come from any field of work – from health and human rights, to education and the environment.  Ashoka seeks to support social innovators who have tested their new idea and are poised to move to the next level of social impact. 

The Ashoka Fellowship is not a leadership award or academic program. It is an active community of leading social entrepreneurs who collaborate and support each others’ lifetime commitment to social change.  Once elected as an Ashoka Fellow, the individual receives strategic support to scale his or her idea, access to a powerful global community of peers, and connections to financial support.  Fellows benefit from this community for life.

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis throughout the year.  

To nominate a Fellow, complete the form here >>

Self-nominations are also welcome.

Who are Ashoka Fellows?

Ashoka Fellows are practical visionaries who introduce, and fully commit themselves to realizing an important, new idea or a new approach to a social problem. They bring to bear on the social problem a fresh analysis and insight about how to fix it. They get systems unstuck and open new opportunities for citizens to be changemakers. With creativity and entrepreneurial skill, they push ahead their idea until it changes a pattern through wide adoption, often over many years.

Ashoka teams use the organization's global selection criteria to gauge a candidate’s fit as an Ashoka Fellow. Drawing on national and global perspectives, our interview sequence explores a candidate’s life history of entrepreneurship and the idea’s emergence and likelihood for systemic impact. 

We learn of candidates in two main ways: we actively look for them in fields ripe for change, and our community (that's you!) continuously alerts us to social entrepreneurs for whom the Ashoka Fellow route may be appropriate.

Frequently Asked Questions

Once elected into the Fellowship, what are Ashoka Fellows required to do?

The Ashoka Fellowship is not a leadership award or an academic fellowship.  It is an active community of leading social entrepreneurs who collaborate and support each others’ lifetime commitment to social change.  Once elected into the Fellowship, all the Fellow needs to do is to continue his or her systems-changing work.

Is Ashoka a charity or a grant-giving institution?

Ashoka is not a charity or welfare organization.  We are looking to support the most promising social innovations in the country and help them reach the next level of social impact.  Although Fellows are eligible for a small three-year living stipend, the main benefit of the Fellowship is the powerful global network, the visibility, and the professional support that Ashoka provides.  In fact, many of our Fellows choose not to receive a stipend.

Does Ashoka invest in social enterprises?

Ashoka does not invest in projects, it invests in people.  The Ashoka Fellowship provides personal and professional support to individuals with systems-changing solutions to a social problem.  Candidates with both for-profit and non-profit models may apply granted that social impact is the primary objective of the idea.  Candidates must demonstrate how their approach is different from what currently exists in the field.

Beyond the Ashoka Fellowship, are there other Ashoka initiatives?

Yes.  Beyond building a fellowship of social entrepreneurs, Ashoka’s goal is to help create a world where everyone is a changemaker.  We have built a wide range of programs to engage all aspects of society – from business and schools to journalists and policymakers.